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Gifted At Risk

In 2009, Gifted At Risk: Poetic Portraits, was published by Great Potential Press (AZ). In presentations, for several years, I have sometimes used a few of my poems about complex high-ability students and adults to underscore concepts or to represent a research finding. These and many more are now available in book form, each with an accompanying narrative that provides context for the portraits and/or pertinent information based on my research and clinical experiences with gifted individuals. The book is coffee-table size, about 150 pages, but it contains a great deal of helpful information for educators, parents, and helping professionals. Most of the poems are about gifted teens, but there are also a few about gifted adults and children.

Other Creative Work
Peterson, J. S. (2010). Raconteur. Advanced Development, 12, 119.
Peterson, J. S. (2006). Reunion. The Family Journal: Counseling & Therapy for Couples & Families, 14(1), 85-87. 
 

Talk with Teens

In 2011, my newest book in the Talk with Teens series was published, updated with information about current concerns, such as cyberbullying. As the others had also been, this book had been vetted by experts on the various topics addressed in approximately 70 small-group sessions.  The extensive introduction serves as a rare short course in school- or community-based, prevention-oriented small-group work, among many potential venues.  

Peterson, J. S. (2011). Talk with Teens about What Matters to Them (Minneapolis: Free Spirit).

For several years, my first two Talk with Teens books were used nationally and internationally by middle and high schools, alternative schools, mental-health agencies, treatment centers, “Y” groups, 4-H clubs, churches, and even families. Both counselors and laypersons, including teachers and youth leaders, used them for guidance about small-group processes and also as guidance curriculum. The books were ideal in advisor-advisee programs in middle schools for enhancing communication skills and for helping young teens connect with peers. They could be used for groups geared to special concerns at many grade levels, and, in order to be useful with students as young as fourth- and fifth-graders, vocabulary could be adjusted. The focused-discussion format fits well with the current developmental, prevention-oriented emphasis in school counseling. Each book contained 50 sessions and 20 copy-ready activity sheets. Each also contained an extensive “how-to” introduction.

During 2005-2006, the two books were restructured, revised, and made into one volume, geared to general-population middle- and high-school students. There are 28 activity sheets for the 75 sessions.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2007). The essential guide to talking with teens: Ready-to-use discussions for school and youth groups. Minneapolis: Free Spirit.
A second book, using a similar format, but focused on working with gifted adolescents and on their social and emotional development, was published the next year, with 33 activity sheets for 70 sessions.
Peterson, J. S. (2008). The essential guide to talking with gifted teens: Ready-to-use group discussions about identity, stress, relationships, and more. Minneapolis: Free Spirit.
 
For those of you who might be interested in how the groups began, and in some of my initial observations related to the social and emotional concerns of students with high ability, I recommend the following article:
Peterson, J. S. (1990). Noon-hour discussion groups: Dealing with the burdens of capability. Gifted Child Today, 13(4), 17-22.
The following are related to application of the basic discussion-group concept in work with gifted students:
Peterson, J. S., Betts, G., & Bradley, T. (2008). Small-group discussion: An affective curriculum. In J. VanTassel-Baska, T. R. Cross, & R. Olenchak (Ed.), Social and emotional curriculum for gifted children (pp. 289-320). Waco, TX: Prufrock/National Association for Gifted Children.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2003). In- and out-of-school discussion groups to support emotional development. In M. Bergsgaard & K. W. McCluskey (Eds.), Celebrating diversity (pp. 45-53). Winnipeg, CN: University of Winnipeg Education Center.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2000). Preparing for college—Beyond the “getting in” part. Gifted Child Today Magazine, 23, 36-45.
 
Peterson, J. S. (1997). Bright, troubled, and resilient, and not in a gifted program. Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, 8, 121-136.
 
Peterson, J. S. (1996). The breakfast club: Poetry and pancakes. Gifted Child Today Magazine, 19(4), 16-19, 49.
 
Peterson, J. S. (1993). What we learned from Genna. Gifted Child Today, 16(1), 15-16.
 
Colangelo, N., & Peterson, J. S. (1992). Group counseling with gifted students. In L. Silverman (Ed.), Counseling the Gifted and Talented (pp. 111-129). Denver: Love.
 
The idea for the Talk with Teens books came during my work with a program for gifted students in a fairly large high school. In the 25-option program I developed (e.g., Future Problem Solving program, National History Day, noon-hour philosophy and classical music appreciation, regular after-school lectures by community experts, a breakfast poetry group, after-school mime and dance, art exhibitions, one-day career-shadowing, teaching languages at elementary schools, dual enrollment, Advanced Placement), I included a “just-growing-up” option. These “discussion groups” quickly developed into the most popular program component. Approximately 115 students per week attended 10 noon-hour groups (two groups per day).
 
When I decided to put the well tested topics into print, the emphasis was on the general population, even though almost all topics remained appropriate for high-ability students as well. Development-oriented discussion can be an effective, efficient service-delivery model for all developing teens. Small groups can be used for the prevention of social and emotional problems and for the support and encouragement of healthy child/adolescent development. In regard to high-ability adolescents, groups can help gifted-education teachers, either alone or co-facilitating with school counselors, proactively attend to social and emotional concerns of high-ability students, including gifted teens who are not motivated to achieve academically during one or more stages of development.
 
Six publications related to prevention-oriented attention to social and emotional concerns of high-ability students bridge the fields of gifted education and school counseling:    
 
Peterson, J. S., & Wachter, C. A. (2010). Understanding and responding to concerns related to giftedness: A study of CACREP-accredited programs. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 33, 311-335.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2009). Counseling gifted students. In B. Erford (Ed.), ACA Encyclopedia of Counseling. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.

Peterson, J. S. (2008). Counseling. In J. A. Plucker & C. M. Callahan (Eds.), Critical issues and practices in gifted education (pp. 119-138). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press. 
 
Peterson, J. S., & Moon, S. M. (2008). Counseling the gifted. In S. Pfeiffer (Ed.), Handbook of Giftedness in Children: Psycho-Educational Theory, Research, and Best Practices (pp. 225-248). New York, NY: Springer.

Peterson, J. S. (2006). Addressing Counseling Needs of Gifted Students. Professional School Counseling, 10, 1, 43-51.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2003). An argument for proactive attention to affective concerns of gifted adolescents. Journal for Secondary Gifted Education, 14, 62-71.
 

Research/Writing, in General
My research has usually practitioner-oriented and related to work in the schools. I continue to research and write about high-ability populations who are not often studied, often not identified for gifted programs, and generally do not fit common stereotypes. My focus is usually on their social and emotional development. I often bridge the fields of gifted education and school counseling in both research-based and conceptual articles.
 
My perspectives on the importance of paying attention to the whole child in an achievement/performance-driven field are presented in the following chapter:
 
Peterson, J. S. (2011). Overcorrecting: Spinning out and missing many. In D. Ambrose, R. J. Sternberg, & B. Sriraman (Eds.), Confronting dogmatism in gifted education (pp.  55-71). New York: Routledge. (L)
 
I received the Early Scholar Award from the National Association for Gifted Children a few years ago, and I was recently interviewed as an eminent scholar for Roeper Review:
 
Henshon, S., & Peterson, J. S. (2012). Wise, Holistic Thinking: An Interview with Jean Peterson. Roeper Review. (ID: 686420 DOI:10.1080/02783193.2012.686420)
 
Other recent interviews:
 
Shaghnessy, M. (January, 2011). An interview with Jean Sunde Peterson about social and emotional needs of the gifted. SENG Update . Retrieved from http://www.sengifted.org/articles_social/shaughnessy_interview_jean_sunde_peterson.shtml.
 
Kimball, C. (December, 2011). Talk with teens about what matters to them. An interview with Jean Sunde Peterson. Prevention Magazine. Retrieved from http://blog.tpronline.org/?p=1645).
 
 
High Achievers
 
Peterson, J. S., Canady, K., & Duncan, N. (in press). Positive Life Experiences: A Qualitative, Cross-sectional, Longitudinal Study of Gifted Graduates. Journal for the Education of the Gifted.
 
Peterson, J. S., Duncan, N., & Canady, K. (2009). A longitudinal study of negative life events, stress, and school experiences of gifted youth. Gifted Child Quarterly, 53, 34-49.
 
 
Underachievers with High Ability
 
Peterson, J. S. (2010). Underachievement. In  I. B. Weiner & W. E. Craighead (Eds.), The Corsini encyclopedia of psychology (4th ed., Vol. 4, R-Z) (pp. 1819-1821). New York: Wiley & Sons.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2002). Underachievers: Students who don’t perform. In J. Smutny (Ed.), Underrepresented groups in gifted education (pp. 307-332). Cresskill, NJ: Hampton Press.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2001). Successful adults who were once adolescent underachievers. Gifted Child Quarterly, 45, 236-249.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2000). A follow-up study of one group of achievers and underachievers four years after high school graduation. Roeper Review, 22, 217-224.
 
Peterson, J. S., & Colangelo, N. (1996). Gifted achievers and underachievers: A comparison of patterns found in school files. Journal of Counseling and Development, 74 399-407.  
 
Peterson, J. S. (1997). Bright, troubled, and resilient, and not in a gifted program. Journal of Secondary Gifted Education, 8, 121-136.
 
 
Nonmainstream Children with High Ability
 
Peterson, J. S. (2002). When home and neighborhood are not the teacher's culture. In S. Bailey, K. McCluskey, & G. Chaffey (Eds.), Present gifts for future talents: Disadvantaged and culturally-different students. Armidale, Australia: TalentEd. (This chapter was reprinted as an article in TalentEd, 19, 1-9, in Australia in 2002.)
 
Peterson, J. S. (2000). Valuing the values—moving from tolerance to affirmation. Reclaiming Children & Youth, 9(1), 36-40.
 
Peterson, J. S. (1999). Gifted—through whose cultural lens? An Application of the Postpositivistic Mode of Inquiry. Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 22, 354-383.
 
Peterson, J. S., & Margolin, L. (1997). Naming gifted children: An example of unintended “reproduction.” Journal for the Education of the Gifted, 21, 82-100.
 
 
At-Risk Gifted Students
 
Peterson, J. S. (submitted). Giftedness, trauma, and development: A longitudinal case study
 
Peterson, J. S. (invited, submitted)  Bullying. In Callahan & Plucker (Eds.), Critical issues in gifted education.
 
Peterson, J. S. (in press).  The Asset-Burden Paradox of Giftedness: A 15-year Phenomenological, Longitudinal Case Study. Roeper Review.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2011).  Giftedness: The asset-vulnerability paradox. In R. J. R. Levesque (Ed.). Encyclopedia of adolescence, Vol. 2 (pp. 1171-1180). New York: Springer.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2009). Myth 17: Gifted and talented individuals do not have unique social and emotional needs. Gifted Child Quarterly, 53, 280-282.
 
Peterson, J. S., Duncan, N., & Canady, K. (2009). A longitudinal study of negative life events, stress, and school experiences of gifted youth. Gifted Child Quarterly, 53, 34-49.
 
Peterson, J. S., & Ray, K. E. (2006). Bullying and the gifted: Victims, perpetrators, prevalence, and effects. Gifted Child Quarterly, 50, 148-168.
 
Peterson, J. S., & Ray, K. E. (2006). Bullying among the gifted: The subjective experience. Gifted Child Quarterly.
 
Jackson, S. M., & Peterson, J. S. (2003). Depressive disorder in highly gifted adolescents. Journal for Secondary Gifted Education, 14, 175-186.  
                                                                                      
Peterson, J. S. (2003). Listening: Resisting the urge to fix them. In K. McCluskey & A. M. Mays (Eds.), Mentoring for Talent Development (pp. 126-142). Lennox, SD: Reclaiming Youth International.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2002). A longitudinal study of post-high-school development in gifted individuals at risk for poor educational outcomes. Journal for Secondary Gifted Education, 14, 6-18.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2001). Gifted and at risk: Four longitudinal case studies. Roeper Review, 24, 31-39.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2000). Gifted, gay, and at risk: A study of the adolescent experience. Gifted Child Quarterly, 44, 149-164.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2000). Preparing for college--beyond the "getting in" part. Gifted Child Today Magazine, 23(2), 36-45.
 
Peterson, J. S. (1999). When it’s hard to leave home. Reclaiming Children and Youth, 8, 14-19.
 
Peterson, J. S. (1998). Six exceptional young women at risk. Reclaiming Children and Youth, 6, 233-238.
 
Peterson, J. S. (1998). The burdens of capability. Reclaiming Children and Youth, 6, 194-198.
 
Parenting Gifted Children and Adolescents
 
Peterson, J. S. (2005, June). Parents as models: Respecting and embracing differences. Parenting for High Potential, 12-15, 30.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2002, December). A counselor’s perspective on parenting high potential. Parenting for High Potential, 18-28, 30.
 
 
Counseling Gifted Individuals
 
Peterson, J. S., & Norman, M. R. (in press). Small-group Affective Curriculum for Gifted Students: A Longitudinal Study of Teacher-Facilitators. Roeper Review.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2011). Adolescence: Growing Up.  Gifted Times. (Newsletter of KAIST Global Institute for Talented Education, a national research center, Korea). Retrieved from http://gifted.kaist.ac.kr/DefBoardView.do?bdcd=0409&msn=88.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2011). Helping gifted teens make sense of themselves: A counselor’s perspective. Gifted, Issue 161, 23-26, New South Wales, Australia.
 
Peterson, J. S., & Norman, M. R. (2011). Student Response to a Small-Group Affective Curriculum in a School for Gifted Children. Gifted Child Quarterly, 55, 167-180.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2011). Survival secrets on the role of counselors in gifted education. In J. Roberts (Ed.), Teachers’ survival guide: Gifted education (pp. 71-73). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press. (L)
 
Peterson, J. S., & Wachter, C. A. (2010). Understanding and Responding to Concerns Related to Giftedness: A Study of CACREP-Accredited Programs. Journal for Education of the Gifted, 33, 311-336.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2011). Differentiating counseling approaches for gifted children and teens: Needs and strategies. In T. R. Cross & J. R. Cross (Eds.), Handbook for counselors serving students with gifts and talents: Development, relationships, school issues, and counseling needs/interventions (pp. 681-698). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2011). The counseling relationship. In T. R. Cross & J. R. Cross (Eds.), Handbook for counselors serving students with gifts and talents: Development, relationships, school issues, and counseling needs/interventions (pp. 443-459). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2009, Winter). The role of teachers when students experience negative life events. Teaching for High Potential, 4-7.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2009). Cultural values. In B. Kerr (Ed.), Encylopedia of giftedness, creativity, and talent (pp. 229-230). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2009). Eating disorders. In B. Kerr (Ed.), Encylopedia of giftedness, creativity, and talent (pp. 277-278). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2009). Learning styles. In B. Kerr (Ed.), Encylopedia of giftedness, creativity, and talent (pp. 529-531). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage.
 
Peterson, J. S. (in press). Counseling gifted students. In B. Erford (Ed.), ACA Encyclopedia of Counseling. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2009). Focusing on Where They Are, Not Where We Think They Should Be. In J. VanTassel-Baska, T. R. Cross, & R. Olenchak (Eds.) Social and emotional curriculum for gifted children (pp. 193-226). National Association for Gifted Children/Prufrock Press.
 
Peterson, J. S., Betts, G., & Bradley, T. (2009). Small-group discussion: An affective curriculum. In J. VanTassel-Baska, T. R. Cross, & R. Olenchak (Ed.) Social and emotional curriculum for gifted children (pp. 289-320). National Association for Gifted Children/Prufrock Press.
 
Peterson, J. S., & Moon, S. M. (2008). Counseling the gifted. In S. Pfeiffer (Ed.), Handbook of giftedness in children: Psychoeducational theory, research, and best practices (pp. 125-148). New York, NY: Springer.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2008). Counseling. In C. Callahan & J. Plucker (Eds.), Critical issues and practices in gifted education (pp. 119-138). Washington, DC: National Association for Gifted Children/Prufrock.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2007). A developmental perspective. In S. Mendaglio & J. S. Peterson (Eds.), Models of counseling gifted children, adolescents, and young adults (pp. 97-126).
Waco, TX: Prufrock.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2007). Conclusion. In S. Mendaglio & J. S. Peterson (Eds.), Models of counseling gifted children, adolescents, and young adults (pp. 97-126). Waco, TX:
Prufrock.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2007). A developmental perspective. In S. Mendaglio & J. S. Peterson (Eds.), Models of counseling gifted students. Waco, TX: Prufrock.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2006). Preparing administrators and counselors to respond to secondary level gifted students. In F. Dixon & S. M. Moon (Eds.), The handbook of secondary gifted education (pp. 649-671). Waco, TX: Prufrock Press.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2006). Addressing counseling needs of gifted students. Professional School Counseling, 10, 1, 43-51.
 
Sal Mendaglio and I co-edited a book which includes several international clinicians' perspectives and techniques related to counseling gifted youth:
 Mendaglio, S., & Peterson, J. S. (2007). Models of counseling gifted children, adolescents, and young adults. Austin, TX: Prufrock.
 
 
Teaching and Consultation in Counselor Education
 
Buitinga, K. J., Struik, K., & Peterson, J. S. (2009). A Solution-Focus Approach to Resolving Conflict among Dutch School Personnel. Journal of Systemic Therapies, 28, 1-17.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2007). Consultation related to giftedness: A school counseling perspective. Journal of Educational and Psychological Consultation, 17, 273-296.
 
Peterson, J. (2007). Hearing their voices: Graduate students and research subjects on the platform. In J. van Swet, P. Ponte & B. Smit (Eds.), Postgraduate Programmes as Platform: A Research-led Approach (pp. 157-173). Rotterdam: Sense Publishers.
 
Peterson, J. S., & Deuschle, C. (2006). A model for supervising school counseling students without teaching experience. Counselor Education and Supervision, 45, 267-281.
 
Peterson, J. S., Goodman, R., Keller, T., & McCauley, A. (2004). Teachers and non-teachers as school counselors: Perceptions of the internship experience. Professional School Counseling, 7, 246-255.
 
Peterson, J. S., & Littrell, J. M. (2002). Creating partnerships: A key counselor capability. Dimensions in Counseling: Research, Theory and Practice, 39, 22-26.
 
Littrell, J. M., & Peterson, J. S. (2002). Establishing a group work program in an elementary school: An in-depth case study. Journal for Specialists in Group Work, 27, 161-172. 
 
Littrell, J. M., & Peterson, J. S. (2001). Facilitating systemic change using the MRI problem-solving approach: One school's experience. Professional School Counseling, 5, 27-33.                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
        
Littrell, J. M., & Peterson, J. S. (2001). Transforming the school culture: A model based on an exemplary school counselor. Professional School Counseling, 4, 310-319.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2000). Constructing the course of human development. In McAuliffe, G., C. Lovell, & Erikson, K. (Eds.), Constructing Counselor Education (pp. 170-194). Alexandria, VA: Association for Counselor Education & Supervision with Donning Publishers.  Revised in Peterson, J. S., & Eriksen, K. (2011). Teaching Lifespan Development. In G. McAuliffe & K. Eriksen (Eds.), Handbook of counselor preparation: Constructivist, developmental, and experiential approaches (pp. 193-208). Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage. (L)
 
Peterson, J. S., & Littrell, J. M. (2000). A school counselor creates a problem-solving culture. International Journal of Educational Reform, 9, 311-320.
 
John Littrel and I co-authored a book on our ethnographic study of Claudia Vangstad, a remarkable Oregon school counselor who transformed the culture of her school. The Peterson and Littrell articles above are based on that study.
Littrell, J. M., & Peterson, J. S. (2005). Portrait and model of a school counselor. Boston: Houghton Mifflin/Lahaska Press.
 
 
Counselor/Teacher Education for Working with Children and Adolescents
 
Peterson, J. S. (2009, Winter). The role of teachers when students experience negative life events. Teaching for High Potential, 4-7.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2009). Individual counseling. In A. Vernon (Ed.), Counseling children and adolescents (4th ed.). Denver: Love Publishing.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2008). Putting out a Fire: An Intern Misperceived. In L. Tyson & J. Whitledge (Eds.), Critical incidents in supervision (pp. 199-204). Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.
 
Peterson, J. S., & Servaty-Seib, H. (2008). Focused, but Flexible: A Developmental Approach to Small-Group Work in Schools. In H. L. K. Coleman & C. Yeh (Eds.), Handbook of School Counseling (pp. 409-429). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2006). Immobile, moving slowly, moving forward: Youth in transition. Asian Journal of Counseling, 13, 163-194.
 
Servaty, H. L., & Peterson, J. (2003). Notifying individual students about the death of someone close: A study of common practices in schools. Death Studies, 27, 167-186.   
  
Peterson, J. S., & Servaty-Seib, H. (2003, January/February). The school counselor's role in death notification. ASCA School Counselor, 22-23.
 
Peterson, J. S. (2003). Group Resistance: "OK. You can lead the group next week." In L. E. Tyson & J. Whitledge (Eds.), Critical incidents in group work. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.